Saturday, 21 June 2008

More new arrivals

Hi

We have more new arrivals at Miss Shimmer so come take alook. In our new arrivals we have new Eeyore tongue bars and belly bars. Exclusive to us are 6mm logo labrets including spongebob, beety boop and character from winnie the pooh. Plus all your favourite belly bars, tongue bars and other body piercing jewellery

Well that's enough for today got to go do some work now, until next time.....take it easy

Saturday, 14 June 2008

The healing process for new piercings

We have been asked many times by out customers here at miss shimmer about new piercings so we thought we would get some information together for general advice

Most if not all new piercing are sore, tender or red for several days after and upto three weeks after. Complete healing normally takes several weeks or longer.
Listed here are some guidlines/approximate times for healing. During this period care must be taken to avoid infection. Sexual activity is discouraged for genital and oral piercings to avoid infection.


Head/Face
Monroe piercing: 3–6 months
Bridge: 3–6 months
Cheek/Anti-Eyebrow: 3–6 months
Ear cartilage: Up to a Year
Ear lobes: 1-3 months
Eyebrow: 1-3 Months
Tragus: 6–12 months
Lip / Labret: 3–4 months
Nostril: 3–6 months
Septum: 3–4 months
Tongue: 2–3 months : 3–4 months
Frenulum

Torso
Female Nipples: 4-6 months
Male Nipples: 4–6 months
Navel piercing: 4–8 months
Hand web: never
Surface: 6–8 months
Female Genital Piercings
Clitoral Hood: 2–3 months
Clitoris: 4-6 weeks
Christina piercing: 3–4 months
Fourchette: 2–3 months
Labia Minora: 2–3 months
Labia Majora: 2–6 months
Triangle: 2–3 months

Male Genital Piercings
Ampallang: 4–8 months
Apadravya: 4–8 months
Dydoe: 3–4 months
Frenum piercing: 3–4 months
Guiche: 4–6 months
Prince Albert: 4–6 months
Reverse Prince Albert: 4–6 months
Scrotum: 3–4 months
Foreskin: 2–3 months
Pubic: 4–6 months
Lorum: 3–4 months

Primary healing usually takes about as long as is listed above; the body jewellery should not be removed during this time as the healing time should not be rushed.
Very often a piercing that seems to be healed will start to have problems if handled without care, exposed to oral contact or unwashed hands if it is not truly healed.

Full healing begins after primary healing is complete and usually takes about the same amount of time again as primary healing, during this period the skin will thicken and regains elasticity.

An additional "toughening up" period takes place after full healing is complete, this period takes about the same amount of time as the primary healing time. During this time the skin remodels itself developing an internal texture in the fistula tube that replaces the shiny scar-like internal surface.

Behavior that promotes healing
Returning to your piercer for an evaluation at any time, if necessary
Practicing good hygiene

Following the recommended aftercare guidelines which your piercer should provide

Behavior that may hinder healing

Contact between the new piercing and another person's skin or bodily fluids
Excessive and unnecessary touching of the piercing, especially with unwashed hands

Failure to take proper aftercare measures

Smoking and drinking alcohol (in the case of oral piercings, if not cleaned properly and rather close to the time of drinking or smoking)

Exposure to irritating substances such as cosmetics, perfume, lotion, some topical ointments, etc

Immersion in chemically-treated pool water, or natural water (i.e. lakes, rivers, streams, and oceans) which contains bacteria, protozoa, and parasites

Cleaning with tea tree oil, as it keeps the wound open

Lack of sleep or low health


Well that's enough for today got to go do some work now, until next time.....take it easy